Parrot Rescue Group Starts in Traverse City

Often when you think of animal rescue groups, most people think of dogs, cats and horses. However, there are many other animals that people get involved with rescuing as well including birds. Husband and wife team, Jake & Tara Hurlin, decided that they wanted to start a parrot rescue and have named it Hurlin’s Hospitality and Parrot Rescue which is operated out of their house in Traverse City.

Hurlin’s Hospitality and Parrot Rescue specializes in urgent and severe rescue  including life or death situations and birds in a state of emergency such as abandonment. They also offer a boarding service to help fund their rescue. They just started their rescue group although they have been rescuing parrots for several years.

The birds have a nice, comfortable room to hang out in.

The birds have a nice, comfortable room to hang out in.

Parrots are often in need of rescue because their owners have to give them up for a behavior issue or a life change in which the person no longer has time for the bid. Because some larger parrots can outlive their owners, they are a huge commitment to make as a pet. Owners should think about what would happen to their Parrot if something would happen to them and the bird would need to be re-homed. For more information about the life spans of Parrots, please click here.  

A green cheek Conure was Tara’s first rescue Parrot and is still very missed. Eight years ago, Remwaldo the Timneh African Grey came into Tara’s life and home. This is the little guy who opened her eyes to how extraordinary these animals truly are. Through him she was introduced to the world of Parrots along with the good and the bad things that come with this knowledge. Over the years, she took in rescue  here and there but never had the resources to really feel like she could make a difference. Now married to a partner, Jake, who shares her love (and workload) for these animals, and with a house of their own, they decided to open their home and dedicate their time to parrots in need. Tara says, “Every person can make a difference in one way or another and I strive to be a part of it. I have found my niche in this huge world.”

This is Remy AKA Remwaldo the Timneh African Grey. He came from someone in Wisconsin who was shutting down their breeding program for financial reasons--He was one of the babies they had left. I found him online 8 years ago and he has been with me ever since. I call him my "feathered husband."

This is Remy AKA Remwaldo the Timneh African Grey. He came from someone in Wisconsin who was shutting down their breeding program for financial reasons–He was one of the babies they had left. I found him online 8 years ago and he has been with me ever since. I call him my “feathered husband.”

Tara got her first parrot when she moved out of her parents house at age 18. There weren’t any birds in her house as a child but she remembers being obsessed with wanting to fly when she was a kid. She made bird costumes out of paper, cardboard and crayons so that she could look like a Blue and Gold Macaw.

Tara says, “Parrots are very deep, intelligent, intellectual creatures. There is so much that we do not know about them. They are very emotional creatures. My opinion is they should never be left completely alone, especially if you work all day. This doesn’t necessarily mean two birds in one cage–none of my birds get along well enough for that. But they do enjoy having someone to talk to during the day. After all, they are flock animals.”

Meet Betty (Boop) the Goffin's Cockatoo! Betty came to us in Early January, 2012. She has a plucking/feather chewing habit due to her rough start in life. When she arrived, she was bald aside from a bit of feather fluff and one random feather sticking out of her wing. From what we heard, she came from a hoarding situation. When she first came to us she was very timid and fearful of new things. As time passes her condition only gets better! She is learning how to play with toys and not pick at herself so much. After a set schedule of continuous showers and play time, her feathers are coming back--and for the most part she is letting them stay! A huge part of her problem was lack of attention, stressful environment, and nutrition. She still clips her wing feathers, and we are working on this. We would love for her to be able to fly again!

Meet Betty (Boop) the Goffin’s Cockatoo! Betty came to us in Early January, 2012. She has a plucking/feather chewing habit due to her rough start in life. When she arrived, she was bald aside from a bit of feather fluff and one random feather sticking out of her wing. From what we heard, she came from a hoarding situation. When she first came to us she was very timid and fearful of new things. As time passes her condition only gets better! She is learning how to play with toys and not pick at herself so much. After a set schedule of continuous showers and play time, her feathers are coming back–and for the most part she is letting them stay! A huge part of her problem was lack of attention, stressful environment, and nutrition. She still clips her wing feathers, and we are working on this. We would love for her to be able to fly again!

The rescue currently has four residents – Goffins Cockatoo (Betty Boop), Citron Cockatoo (Maggie May), Timneh African Grey (Remwaldo/Remy) and Red Lory (Buddy)

Meet Maggie! Maggie came to us on 11/23/2013 from owners who had good intentions, but not enough time. As far as we know, she has been in several homes in the last 10 years. She came to us wearing a plastic collar because she mutilates on her left side. Upon further inspection we discovered she cannot fully move her left wing. This may be from a past injury as she used to be housed with birds much larger than herself. After a trip to the vet we found out there is so much scar tissue on her left shoulder that she cannot extend her wing. Once the wound on her shoulder heals she will be brought in for scar removal surgery in hopes she will be able to fly again someday. Maggie has a big vocabulary for a cockatoo and is always talking. We most frequently hear "Hi Maggie!" "Pretty bird" "Whatcha doin'". She also says and waves "buhbye!" After everything she has been through, she is a very happy girl.

Meet Maggie! Maggie came to us on 11/23/2013 from owners who had good intentions, but not enough time. As far as we know, she has been in several homes in the last 10 years. She came to us wearing a plastic collar because she mutilates on her left side. Upon further inspection we discovered she cannot fully move her left wing. This may be from a past injury as she used to be housed with birds much larger than herself. After a trip to the vet we found out there is so much scar tissue on her left shoulder that she cannot extend her wing. Once the wound on her shoulder heals she will be brought in for scar removal surgery in hopes she will be able to fly again someday.
Maggie has a big vocabulary for a cockatoo and is always talking. We most frequently hear “Hi Maggie!” “Pretty bird” “Whatcha doin'”. She also says and waves “buhbye!” After everything she has been through, she is a very happy girl.

This is Buddy the Red Lory. He came to me from a family who could no longer keep him due to their health problems. He loves women (especially me) and typically is not very nice to men. He loves to play on his back and wrestle with my hand. His favorite toy is a miniature baby rattle--he picks it up with his foot and shakes it!

This is Buddy the Red Lory. He came to me from a family who could no longer keep him due to their health problems. He loves women (especially me) and typically is not very nice to men. He loves to play on his back and wrestle with my hand. His favorite toy is a miniature baby rattle–he picks it up with his foot and shakes it!

Although the rescue doesn’t currently have parrots available for adoption, they will in the future. Tara says, “it depends on the condition of the bird and how much time it will take for them to be suitable for a home. I will be matching the birds to their owners–Parrots “choose” their owners, not the other way around. Every parrot needs their fair chance to be with a person they connect with.”

The Hurlins also have two miniature dachshunds and an Iguana – and they occasionally take in reptiles in need as well.

The Hurlins are currently working on becoming an official non-profit group and are in need of donations and supplies. Right now, every penny is paid out of their pockets from their regular jobs. Donations are needed for supplies (toys, perches, dishes, newspaper), cages, medical bills, food and utilities. They also offer Parrot boarding for people going on vacation to help fund the rescue. The Parrots who are boarded are in a separate room from where the rescue birds are and more information can be found about this on the Facebook page here.

If you or someone you know needs help finding a new home for their Parrot or needs to relinquish their bird and lives in the Traverse City/Northern Michigan area, Tara says not to hesitate in contacting her.

Contact information:

Tara & Jake Hurlin
10413 Thiel Rd.
Traverse City, MI 49685
231-392-6047
hurlinsparrotrescue@gmail.com

Donation account: click here.

Advertisements

Tagged: ,

One thought on “Parrot Rescue Group Starts in Traverse City

  1. Brian December 6, 2014 at 3:14 pm Reply

    Hay guys,figured I better text yous and tell you just how much christina and I are loving our new family member Star.she,s got to be the best mannered bird I’ve ever seen.we love her lots.Thanks again.Brian &Christina.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: